The person behind

Kennel Strandly is placed south of Hilleroed, in a small community called Ny Hammersholt.

I live in an old house, builded in 1877, together with my two teenage girls. We have a lot of room, inside and outside, and the forest in our backyard.

Our dogs lives together with us in the house - because they are first and foremost our pets.

Being a breeder came along with a deep and strong interest for structure, movement and health. To breed you have to understand why your breed looks like it does, and know about the specific function for bones, muzzle etc. Why does the aussie have to be slightly longer than tall - like the standard calls for? Why does different breed have to run different - and what is the reason that the aussie has to run, the way it is described?

As a breeder we have to know about the breed standard - but it is not enough to know about it, you have to understand every single word in it, and the reason why it is put there to begin with. There are no words in the breed standard, that can be ignored! Before we understand this, we will not be able to improve the breed. We owe our breed to be true to the standard.

To be a serious breeder, we have to seek new knowledge constantly. At this moment people learn new things about the dog behaviour, the inherity of sick genes, the way dogs lives in a herd etc. We have to learn this to be better dog owners, and to be better breeders too. We owe this to our dogs!


An article writen by an American breeder, explaining the difference between good and bad breeding: Why pay more.


Learn about my breeding goals

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Besides being an aussie owner and a breeder, my big passion is showing. I also teach puppy class and familydog class within the Danish Kennel Club. I am part of the comitee for educating instructors in the Danish Kennel Club. Finally I also teach in dog behavior.

Dog behavior is another of my big hobbies. I find it very fascinating, educating and interesting to see how dogs communicate with each other. The way they evaluate other dogs they meet on a walk in the forest - they are so much better than we are ever going to be, to evaluate whats in front of it.




Best regards
Gitte Strandly